BiWeek 2019

This week (September 16-23) is #BiWeek 2019! This is a week to celebrate the B in LGBT and to raise up the voices and experiences of bisexual people.

Despite a growing understanding and acceptance of the LGBT community and increased legal protections based on sexual orientation and gender identity, the experiences and realities of bisexual people has largely been invisible. Did you know bisexual people comprise about half (52%) of LGB people in the United States? Did you also know that violence, poverty, discrimination, and poor physical and mental health outcomes within the bisexual population are often at rates higher than their lesbian and gay peers?

Far too often, bisexual people are frequently swept into the greater lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) community, as their specific disparities are made invisible within data about the LGB community as a whole. That’s why, in 2016, MAP released a groundbreaking report Invisible Majority: The Disparities Facing Bisexual People and How to Remedy Them, which focuses on the “invisible majority” of the LGBT community: dvthe nearly five million adults in the U.S. who identify as bisexual and the millions more who have sexual or romantic attraction to or contact with people of more than one gender.

Since then, MAP has released additional reports looking at bisexual older adults, bisexual transgender people and more. For #BiWeek 2019, check out MAP’s resources that provide an overview into the lives of bisexual people, including an introduction to the issues facing bisexual people.

Understanding Issues Facing LGBT People in the U.S.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, MAP, in partnership with the Center for American Progress, GLAAD, and the Human Rights Campaign, is releasing an updated edition of Understanding Issues Facing LGBT People in the U.S. Led by transgender women, drag queens, homeless LGBT teens, lesbians, gay men, and allies, many of whom were people of color, the Stonewall Riots, which came in response to an early morning police raid of the Stonewall Inn in New York City targeting LGBT people, were a key turning point in the fight for LGBT equality in the United States.    

Fifty years later, much has been accomplished, yet much still remains to be done. The landmark marriage equality ruling by the United States Supreme Court in 2015 allowed same-sex couples to marry nationwide, yet the federal government is arguing that employers should be allowed to legally fire LGBT people, and that adoption agencies should be able to keep kids in foster care rather than allow them to be adopted by qualified, loving, same-sex parents.   

This primer highlights the major areas in which equality as advanced for LGBT people, as well as the continued legal barriers to fully participating in American life. It is no longer a crime to be gay, yet many LGBT people still experience discrimination when simply going about their daily lives—whether eating at a diner with their families or friends, trying to obtain safe and inclusive healthcare, or interacting with the criminal justice system. Just last month, MAP released a new map showing which states ban the use of so-called “gay panic” and “trans panic” defenses in court. These defenses are legal strategies in which a person who has committed a violent crime against an LGBT person will claim that the victim’s sexual orientation or gender identity caused the attacker to commit the crime. 

As we honor the passion and activism of those at Stonewall 50 years ago and those who continue to fight for full equality to this day, MAP is fully committed to ensuring that all people have a fair chance to pursue health and happiness, earn a living, take care of the ones they love, be safe in their communities, and participate in civic life.  

Here are a few ways you can take action: