Majority of LGBT Americans Can Now Get an Accurate Birth Certificate Without Burdensome Requirements

Thanks to recent updates in Idaho and Florida, 51% of LGBT adults now live in states that issue new birth certificates without requiring sex reassignment surgery or a court order. Previously transgender people in these states had to provide proof of “sexual reassignment surgery,” while those living in Idaho could not get an updated birth certificate.  Now transgender people in Florida can provide a letter from a medical provider asserting they have undergone transition-related care to change their gender marker. In Idaho, transgender people must complete paperwork, and have it notarized—a simple and straightforward process.

The changes in these states are major milestones in the fight for equality for transgender and gender nonconforming people.

Official identity documents—such as drivers’ licenses, birth certificates, and passports—that do not match a transgender person’s gender identity greatly complicate that person’s life. According to the United States Transgender Survey, nearly one-third (32%) of respondents who have shown an ID with a name or gender that did not match their gender presentation were verbally harassed, denied benefits or service, asked to leave, or assaulted. A recent ad produced by MAP called “Movie Theater” depicts how transgender people can experience harassment, discrimination and denial of equal treatment in places of public accommodation. In it, a transgender man is the subject of harassment because his gender marker on his drivers’ license does not match his gender identity.

Thirty-one states either require proof of surgery, a court order, or have unclear policies regarding updating the gender markers on birth certificates. For some transgender people, requiring surgery is neither affordable nor desirable. And another three states do not allow for amending the gender marker on the birth certificate.

By eliminating this requirement for updating their birth certificates, these 16 states and the District of Columbia are making it easier for transgender people to go about their daily lives and to exist equally.

Read more about the updated requirements from Equality Florida: http://www.eqfl.org/transactionfl/birth-certificates and Lambda Legal: https://www.lambdalegal.org/blog/20180406_idaho-makes-history

Click here to visit MAP’s updated equality maps page to see where your state stands on identity document laws and policies, including requirements for updating gender markers: http://www.lgbtmap.org/equality-maps/identity_document_laws 

NEW AD: “Movie Theater”

Today, MAP released a new ad “Movie Theater,” showing the all-too-common experience of transgender people around the country, who can face daily discrimination, harassment, and denial of equal treatment in public places.

This ad accompanies MAP’s latest report, LGBT Policy Spotlight: Public Accommodations Nondiscrimination Laws, which provides a comprehensive overview of the gaps in nondiscrimination laws for LGBT people in public spaces—and the devastating impact of the lack of protections.

The report highlights that discrimination is pervasive. In fact, the 2015 U.S. Transgender Survey found that 31% of transgender respondents reported experiencing discrimination in places of public accommodations in the past year alone when staff knew or thought they were transgender.

As the Supreme Court prepares to issue a ruling in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, public places have become the next battleground in the fight for full equality for LGBT people. The core issue is whether public accommodations—places of business, public transit, hotels, restaurants, taxi cabs and more—can refuse service to people just because of who they are or whom they love.

As a nation, we decided a long time ago that businesses and services that are open to the public should be open to all. Nobody should be turned away simply because of who they are.

USA Today Exclusive: ‘Not just about a cake shop’: LGBT people battle bias in everyday routines

 

This week, USA Today published an exclusive feature about the impacts of the everyday experiences of discrimination faced by LGBT people. To tell this story, USA Today turned to MAP’s latest report, a policy spotlight on nondiscrimination protections in public accommodations around the country. The article also features a new ad entitled Movie Theater, showing how transgender people in particular face discrimination and harassment in public accommodations.

MAP’s mission is to help speed equality for LGBT people by reaching broad audiences with powerful messaging, policy research, and public education videos. The visibility of MAP’s work in a major news outlet like USA Today, which has a daily readership of nearly 3.3 million people, helps us spread the message that LGBT people continue to face discrimination today, and that nondiscrimination protections need to be enacted nationwide. Businesses that are open to the public should be open to all.

Click here to read the story from USA Today

New Graphics: Public Accommodations Nondiscrimination Laws

MAP’s latest report shows how a lack of nondiscrimination protections in public accommodations puts LGBT people at risk in their everyday lives. At least 25% of LGBT people experience discrimination in employment, housing, or public accommodations. As a result, many LGBT people are forced to change their daily lives just to get through the day without harassment or fear.

As part of the LGBT Policy Spotlight: Public Accommodations Nondiscrimination Laws, MAP launched a series of free, shareable infographics.

New Report: Public Accommodations Nondiscrimination Laws

Yesterday, the Movement Advancement Project, along with our partners at the Equality Federation Institute, Freedom for All Americans, and the National Center for Transgender Equality launched a new report, LGBT Policy Spotlight: Public Accommodations Nondiscrimination Laws. This report provides a comprehensive overview of the gaps in nondiscrimination laws for LGBT people in public spaces—and the devastating impact of the lack of protections.

Among key findings in this report:

  • Anti-LGBT discrimination remains widespread. In 2016, at least one in four LGBT people experienced discrimination in public accommodations because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. In 2015, nearly one-third of transgender people experienced discrimination in places of public accommodations when staff knew or thought they were transgender.
  • The existing patchwork of protections leaves LGBT people vulnerable to discrimination. Currently, no federal law prohibits discrimination in public accommodations based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Only nineteen states and Washington D.C. have laws protecting people from discrimination in public accommodations based on sexual orientation, gender identity, and sex, leaving LGBT people in 31 states at risk for legal discrimination.
  • Opponents have launched coordinated attacks on the ability of LGBT people to participate fully in public life. The report details four distinct strategies: bathroom bans that would limit transgender people’s access to restrooms; ballot measures to repeal nondiscrimination protections; state preemption of cities and counties prohibiting them from enacting local ordinances; and, creating religious exemptions to nondiscrimination laws. These efforts are part of a larger attempt to create a license to discriminate.
  • There is broad public and business support for nondiscrimination protections for LGBT people. In a 2017 PRRI poll, 72% of Americans said they support laws that protect LGBT from discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations. A 2017 Small Business Majority poll similarly found that 65% of business owners agree that businesses should not be allowed to deny service to LGBT people because of religious beliefs.

This report has already garnered significant attention in the media, showing the resonance and importance of these findings:

As the Supreme Court prepares to issue a ruling in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, public places have become the next battleground in the fight for full equality for LGBT people. The core issue is whether public accommodations—places of business, public transit, hotels, restaurants, taxi cabs and more—can refuse service to people just because of who they are or whom they love.

As a nation, we decided a long time ago that businesses and services that are open to the public should be open to all. Nobody should be turned away simply because of who they are.

Help MAP spread the word about the critical need for nondiscrimination protections in public places for LGBT people. Donate here, or take action on social media!