What We Know About LGBT People with Disabilities

Today marks the 29th anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a landmark civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on disability in nearly every area of life, from work to housing and public accommodations and education. The ADA also ensures that people living with HIV aren’t discriminated against.  

New research shows that LGBT people are more likely to have a disability than the general population.For example, in a survey of more than 26,000 transgender people, 39% reported having a disability.  Andone in three lesbians and one in three bisexual women report having a disability in a population-based survey in Washington.  

As the country reflects on what work remains for the full inclusion of people with disabilities in America, the Movement Advancement Project, in partnership with the Center for American Progress’s Disability Justice Initiative and LGBT Research and Communications Project, the National Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR), and the National LGBTQ Task Force, released a short summary of what we know about LGBT people with disabilities.  

U.S. Supreme Court Considers Three Cases That Could Take America Backward

Did you know that there are three huge cases on the U.S. Supreme Court’s docket for this fall about whether LGBT people are worthy of equal opportunity or whether they may be treated as legally inferior citizens?

Did you know that there are three significant cases on the U.S. Supreme Court’s docket for this fall about whether LGBT people are worthy of equal opportunity or whether they may be treated as legally inferior citizens?

The Court will hear oral arguments in October about whether LGBT people will continue to have protections under federal nondiscrimination law, or whether it would be legal under federal law for employers to fire LGBT people just for who they are or whom they love. These cases will impact the ability of LGBT people to provide for themselves and their families.

Today MAP released a new brief, “Can LGBT People Be Legally Fired? U.S. Supreme Court Considers Three Cases That Could Take America Backward” highlighting what’s at stake with these cases.

http://www.lgbtmap.org/scotus-2019-titlevii

Together, the cases have the potential to take America backward. That’s because if the Court rules that LGBT people are not protected by existing federal workplace protections, anti-LGBT opponents will rapidly use the same legal reasoning to work to attempt to overturn critical federal protections in housing, healthcare, credit, education and more. In short, LGBT people could soon find themselves living in a nation where federal law says it is legal for them to be denied a job, fired, discriminated against at school, denied a loan, rejected by a doctor, and evicted from an apartment, simply because they are LGBT.

Now is the time to reiterate the importance of nondiscrimination for LGBT people and all people. That’s why MAP is releasing a new brief today that describes the cases, how the Court could rule, and what the implications of the Court’s rulings could mean for LGBT people not just at work but in all areas of life.