Be An Ally! Support #SafeSchools for All Students!

This week is Ally Week, a student-led program where LGBTQ K- 12 students and educators lead the conversation on what they need from allies in school. This important week of dialogue and understanding is organized by our colleagues at GLSEN.

Every student deserves a fair chance to learn and thrive in school—including students who are transgender. However, according to the 2015 National School Climate Survey, 70% of transgender students said they avoided bathrooms because they felt unsafe or uncomfortable.

Last week, MAP and GLSEN released a new ad, “Hallway” showing how harmful it can be to force transgender students to use a separate restroom, putting them at risk of bullying and abuse. Transgender students, like all students, want a chance to learn, graduate, and make their families proud, without having to be scared every time they need to do something as basic as using the restroom.

That’s why GLSEN and MAP have launched the Safe Schools Movement campaign to encourage parents, educators, youth, and policymakers to advocate for safe schools for LGBTQ youth.

This Ally Week, there are plenty of ways to take action and support safe schools for all students:

  • WATCH AND SHARE: Watch the new Hallway ad and share it on social media using the #supportsafeschools hashtag.
  • READ MORE in the exclusive article in Teen Vogue.
  • TAKE ACTION: Join the Safe Schools Movement!
  • LEARN more about transgender students and their experiences in school in a new brief from MAP, GLSEN, and NCTE.
  • HAVE A CONVERSATION with your friends and family about supporting safe schools for transgender students. Check out the resources available at www.supportsafeschools.org
  • SUPPORT MORE ADS LIKE “HALLWAY”: Donate $25 to support MAP’s hard-hitting ads that are changing the national conversation about transgender students.

 

Ten Things You (Maybe) Didn’t Know About Bisexual People

  1. 5% of women and 2% of men identify as bisexual.
  2. People who identify as bisexual comprise more than half—52%–of all LGB people in the United States.
  3. People of color are more likely to identify as bisexual, and women of color comprised 36% of bisexual women, compared to 26% of heterosexual women.
  4. 1 in 5 (21%) transgender people identify as bisexual.
  5. Bisexual people are more likely to be parents than gay men or lesbians.
  6. Nearly half (48%) of bisexual older women live in poverty.
  7. 31% of bisexual people report being sexually harassed at work because of their sexuality.
  8. Bisexual people are more likely than all U.S. adults to live on less than $30,000 a year.
  9. 47% of bisexual students report one or more instances of sexual assault in their lifetime.
  10. Bisexual people are at greater risk for mental and physical health disparities, including being more like to have anxiety and mood disorders.

September 23 is the start of Bisexual Awareness Week, a week dedicated to raising the visibility of the LGBT community’s invisible majority.

All too often, bisexual people are grouped in with the broader LGB community, and when that happens, their specific disparities and challenges are made invisible—leaving them without the specific care and support that address their unique challenges.

The evidence is clear: bisexual people face serious disparities; yet, research and data about bisexual people and their lives is limited at best. That’s why, in September 2016, MAP released a report, Invisible Majority: The Disparities Facing Bisexual People and How to Remedy Them, which found that bisexual people face discrimination and stigma both from the LGBT community and from non-LGBT people. This creates myriad disparities for bisexual people including economic insecurity, increased violence, and poorer health.

This #BiWeek2018, learn more about the unique challenges facing bisexual people with resources from MAP. The following resources offer an overview into the lives of bisexual people:

Special thanks to our partners at SAGE, the National Center for Transgender Equality, the Bisexual Organizing Project (BOP), the Bisexual Resource Center (BRC), and BiNet USA who have been invaluable partners in creating these crucial resources.

 

Support Safe Schools for Transgender Students

Imagine not being able to use the bathroom at school, or being called the wrong name by your teachers or principal. All too often, that’s what transgender students face in school, making it impossible for them to attend school safely.

A new ad, “Hallway” produced by MAP and released today in partnership with GLSEN shows how just how harmful it can be to force transgender students to use a separate restroom, putting them at risk of bullying and abuse.

Read more about “Hallway” and the Safe Schools Movement in this exclusive from Teen Vogue.

Everyone, including transgender students, cares about safety and privacy in restrooms and locker rooms. School districts across the country have successfully worked to ensure that transgender students have access to facilities that match their gender identity while still protecting the privacy of all students. However, only 14 states plus the District of Columbia have laws explicitly prohibiting discrimination in schools on the bases of gender identity and sexual orientation.

To fill in the gap in state laws, many school districts were turning to the federal government for protections. In 2014, the Obama administration issued official guidance clarifying that transgender students are protected from discrimination based on Title IX’s prohibition on sex discrimination. However, the Trump administration recently rescinded that guidance, signaling that transgender students cannot count on their federal government for support. And, in February of this year, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights announced that they will no longer be investigating complaints of discrimination filed by transgender students.

According to a new brief released by today by MAP, GLSEN, and the National Center for Transgender Equality, more laws and policies are needed to ensure transgender students can fully participate in school.

Every student deserves a fair chance to learn and thrive in school—including students who are transgender. And our schools have a responsibility to protect all students from bullying, harassment, and discrimination.

MAP is teaming up with GLSEN, the leading education organization working to create safe and inclusive K-12 schools, to launch the Safe Schools Movement to advocate for safe schools for LGBTQ youth.

Join the Safe Schools Movement and take action today: www.glsen.org/safeschools

National Suicide Prevention Week

Talking About Suicide & LGBT Populations

This week is National Suicide Prevention Week 2018 (Sept. 9-15)—a vital opportunity to be part of conversations about the importance of suicide prevention, advancing awareness of warning signs, and much more.

Last year, MAP, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) and the Johnson Family Foundation released the 2nd edition of Talking About Suicide & LGBT Populations, a fully updated resource for safe and accurate messaging about suicide and LGBT people.

También está disponible en español http://lgbtmap.org/como-hablar-sobre-el-suicidio

The guide provides effective approaches for helping ensure that public conversations about LGBT suicide do not contribute to misinformation or risk of contagion among vulnerable people. By lifting up the role of resilience, family acceptance and peer support—as well as examining contributions of individual, interpersonal, community and societal risk factors—Talking About Suicide & LGBT Populations provides facts about suicide and LGBT people, as well as ways to talk about suicide safely, accurately, and in ways that advance vital public discussions about preventing suicide among LGBT people and supporting their health and well-being.

Talking About Suicide & LGBT Populations was produced in partnership with the Center for American Progress, GLAAD, GLSEN, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, the National LGBTQ Task Force, PFLAG, SAGE, the Transgender Law Center, and The Trevor Project.

For information about receiving print copies of the guide, please contact Molly Tafoya, MAP’s Director of Community Engagement at mtafoya@lgbtmap.org

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

LGBT Employees Lack Crucial Protections

You may be surprised to learn that LGBT employees lack explicit federal protections against employment discrimination and face higher levels of harassment on the job. In fact, only 20 states plus Washington D.C. have laws that explicitly prohibit employment discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Click here to see a map of which states have updated their laws to ensure that LGBT are treated fairly at work.

The U.S. Supreme Court may soon hear a case featuring Aimee Stephens, who was fired from her job R&G and G&R Harris Funeral Homes, after coming out as transgender. Last March, the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of Stephens and the EEOC finding that her firing at work was illegal under Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination based on sex at work. The ACLU and the ACLU of Michigan are representing Aimee Stephens in this case.

Last week, MAP and the National LGBTQ Workers Center released a new brief LGBT People in the Workplace which details the history, demographics and experiences of LGBT people in the workplace. Click here to learn more.